May 112015
 

No. 6 is a short series (11 episodes) that works really well for quite a while, but crumbles in its closing episodes. It starts as a boy named Shion living in a utopian city helps and feeds an injured child named Rat. Four years later, it’s clear that this moment of kindness has essentially ruined Shion’s life, casting him out of the city’s elite area and into the life of a menial caretaker. In this role he stumbles across a secret that is killing the city’s people and is sentenced to death for discovering it. Rat rescues him, and from there the story develops, exploring their relationship and their conflicting attitudes towards the city (Shion wishing to save it and Rat to destroy).

This goes very well for several episodes, although I felt the show should have spent more time with the boys and with Shion’s friend Safu and less with his mother’s travails within the city. When it comes time to actually deal with the city, however, the story falls apart. From a relatively straightforward sci-fi dystopia the story suddenly shifts to one about a magic bee goddess out for revenge. There are some strong character moments in these episodes, but it goes overboard with near-death and actual-death experiences, not to mention a really silly deus ex machina moment.

Worse, the show ends with an off-putting moment of ambiguity as Rat kisses Shion and then departs. This works better (but still is not fitting) in the manga, where we are at least told (if not convinced) that Rat is a free spirit who needs to wander. The anime does not emphasize this idea, instead adding immediately before this a moment where Rat resolves to stay with Shion and die in a collapsing building rather than flee and save himself. In this context, where if not for the intervention of Magic Bee Jesus, Rat would have given up his life to stay with Shion, his decision to walk away moments later is inexplicable and alienating.

The late turn into fantastic nonsense and the forced ambiguity of the ending doesn’t undo my enjoyment of the preceding episodes, but it makes the series feel incomplete. The show I was watching for 8 or 9 episodes never ended, and the show I was watching in the last 2 or 3 never started.

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